Motivation’s journey has been a truly incredible one. But what has made it all the more special is the people we have shared it with. Together, we achieve so much.

Over the last 26 years, Motivation has helped thousands of disabled people around the world keep healthy, take control of their lives and work their way out of poverty. This has only been possible thanks to people like you.

In 1989, Simon Gue and I won a competition to design a wheelchair suitable for use in developing countries at the Royal College of Art. We used our prize money to travel to Bangladesh where, with our friend Richard Frost, we built our wheelchair for a disability organisation in Dhaka.

Two years later, we set up Motivation and since then, the charity has impacted on the lives of disabled people in 120 countries around the world.

Motivation’s journey has been a truly incredible one. But what has made it all the more special is the people we have shared it with. We are very lucky that our Motivation friends and family feel so passionate about our cause and support our projects so readily.

But this spring, changes to regulations mean our relationship with our supporters may have to change. We may not be able to contact you without your express permission – even if you are already a loyal supporter. This means we may not be able to let you know the impact of your donations or ask you for your help – unless you give us consent to do so.

Give us permission to contact you

If you would like to continue to receive updates about our work and ways you can help, you must let us know. Please complete our online form here, call us on 0117 9660 398 or email us at [email protected]. Please also get in touch using the details above if you would like to sign up for our newsletters for the first time.

Together we can continue to change the lives of people like Jane

In 2010, Jane was travelling to work when the car she was in was hit by a lorry. The accident involved eight people and everyone but Jane was killed.

I spent one year in hospital, with four fractures and eight screws in my back. I broke the record for the most visitors at the hospital but I was the only survivor – I had to be seen to be believed.

When Jane was discharged, she paid for a wheelchair and attempted to use it without any training. But she had trouble breathing when she was sitting in it and suffered from pressure sores. Instead of moving around, she had no choice but to stay in bed. She found it difficult to accept she would be paralysed forever. She hoped that it was temporary – that she would be able to walk again in the future. Lonely and hopeless, she quickly developed depression.

But before long, Motivation visited Jane at one of her physiotherapy sessions. She received an appropriate wheelchair and cushion, and learnt about her posture. For the first time, she began to feel that she was not alone.

She attended Motivation’s peer training where she learnt how to prevent pressure sores, and transfer herself from her wheelchair to a bed or toilet. She finally had other disabled people to talk to about relationships, and she learnt all about her rights from other wheelchair users.

Jane moved into her own flat soon after the training, and now lives independently. She has a passion for helping other people with disabilities and visits local schools to raise awareness of the rights of disabled children.

Now I know it is my right to have a relationship. It is my right to access any building. It is my right to work.

If you would like to continue to receive updates about our work and ways you can help - or sign up for our newsletters for the first time -  please complete our online form here, call us on 0117 9660 398 or email us at [email protected].